"The Gender Citation Gap in International Relations" with Professor Barbara Walter

Invite-only lunch and discussion with Professor Barbara Walter, Professor of Political Science and Associate Dean at the Graduate School of International Affairs and Pacific Studies at the University of California San Diego.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
 

About Professor Walter:

Barbara Walter is Professor of Political Science and Associate Dean at the Graduate School of International Affairs and Pacific Studies at the University of California San Diego.  She is an authority on international security, with an emphasis on civil wars, unconventional violence, and bargaining and conflict.  She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago, and has held post docs at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, and at the War and Peace Institute at Columbia University.   Walter is on the editorial board of the American Political Science Review, International Organization, Journal of Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly, and International Interactions.  She is also the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, including awards from the National Science Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Guggenheim, and Smith Richardson Foundations. 

 

About the Paper:

The Gender Citation Gap in International Relations

By Daniel Maliniak, Ryan Powers & Barbara F. Walter

We investigate the extent to which citation and publication patterns differ between men and women in the international relations literature. Using data from the Teaching, Research, and International Policy project on peer-reviewed publications between 1980 and 2007, we show that women are systematically cited less than men after controlling for a large number of variables including year of publication, quality of publication, substantive focus, theoretical perspective, methodology, tenure status, and institutional affiliation. These results are robust to a variety of modeling choices. We then turn to network analysis to investigate the extent to which the gender of an article’s author affects that article’s relative centrality in the network of citations between papers in our sample. We show that articles authored by women are also systematically less central than articles authored by men, all else equal. We argue and then show that this is likely due to two factors: (1) women tend to cite themselves less than men, and (2) men (who make up a disproportionate share of IR scholars) tend to cite men more than women. This is the first study in political science to reveal significant gender differences in citation patterns. This finding is especially significant since citation counts have historically been viewed as a relatively objective and important measure of the quality and impact of research.