Balandugu Kan from Guinea in Concert


The Skirball Cultural Center presents a free concert by Balandugu Kan, featuring master drummer Mamady Keita.


Saturday, June 02, 2007
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Skirball Cultural Center
2701 North Sepulveda Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90049

  • Balandugu Kan, meaning "the sound of the village Balandugu" in Guinea, is a 12-piece ensemble formed in 2000 in Conakry, Guinea. Mamady Keita, a world-renowned master drummer from Balandugu, inspired band leaders Rahsan and Kahlil Keita to carry on the tradition, art and spirit of Balandugu through their music. Balandugu Kan has performed at many venues in Southern California, including the Ford Amphitheatre, UCLA, Soka University, the Sunset Junction, the African Marketplace and the Temple Bar.

This concert is part of CAFÉ Z  --  Back for a new season, this popular concert series showcases outstanding local talents in a beautiful outdoor setting.

Followed by a free screening of Diamonds in the Rough.

  • U.S. premiere of "Diamonds in the Rough: A Story of Ugandan Hip Hop."  This documentary explores urban Africa through the eyes of four emerging hip-hop artists in the Ugandan capital of Kampala. Inspiring audiences to make the best of life against insufferable odds, these active, enthusiastic, and politically aware young talents are heroes in their community and voices of a new generation. (2007, 86 min.)
  • A Q&A with filmmaker Brett Mazurek and some of the film's featured artists will follow the screening.

This film is part of CINEMA Z  --  a monthly film series which explores the lives of great musicians and follows musical and cultural traditions and influences from around the world.

Special Instructions

No reservations necessary.


Cost : Free and open to the public; check with the Skirball regarding parking charges.

For more information please contant:

Skirball Cultural CenterTel: 310-440-4500

info@skirball.org


www.skirball.org


Sponsor(s): , Skirball Cultural Center. Information about non-ASC events is posted for informational purposes and does not necessarily reflect opinions of or endorsements by African Studies personnel.