Global Cities: Water, Infrastructure and Environment - A Dialogic Conference


Various Mon 16th May 2005 12 pm Pacific Suites Hotel, Santa Barbara Globalization Research Center--Africa


Monday, May 16, 2005
12:00 PM - 12:15 PM
Los Angeles, CA 90095

In recent years, most Third World nations have experienced a very rapid growth in their urban populations without the corresponding capacity and resources to expand public provision of basic services such as water supply and sanitation. The result is that in virtually every urban center, many people live in neighborhoods with little or no provision of basic infrastructure facilities that are essential for health. Improved access to water supply and sanitation brings with it considerable economic benefits at the household level. Beyond reducing the water-borne and water-washed diseases, providing better access to water and sanitation confers many other diverse benefits ranging from the easily identifiable costs avoided due to less illness to the time saved associated with closer location of the facilities.

The purpose of this conference is to critically analyze the accomplishments and shortcomings of African governance, from a comparative perspective, as it relates to the critical issues of water supply and sanitation in the context of rapidly expanding urban populations.

Some of the questions to be addressed include: What is the value added in expanding WSS access to the poor? How has globalization affected the tens and thousands of smaller urban centers in developing countries with a high proportion of the world’s urban poor live in comparison with the capital city or port cities which are the hub of economic activity? What effects does the commodification of water supply

MONDAY, MAY 16, 2005
The Breakfast Cafe

7:00-8:15 pm Dinner & Welcome
Edmond Keller, Director, UCLA Globalization Research Center Africa
Deane Neubauer, Executive Director, Globalization Research Network

8:15-9:00 pm
Session I: Historical and Comparative Perspective
Mark Amen, University of South Florida


TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2005
The Fireside Room

9:00-10:00 am
Session II: The View from the Global South
Jo Beall, London School of Economics


10:00-10:30 am Refreshment Break

10:30-11:30 am
Session III: The Overarching African Themes
Fantu Cheru, American University


11:30-12:00 pm Discussion

12:00-1:00 pm Lunch

1:00-2:00 pm
Session IV: Globalization and the Provision of Public Goods at the Local Level
Michael Douglass, University of Hawaii-Manoa


2:00-3:00 pm
Session V: Impacts of Water Privatization on Health and Wellbeing of the Urban Poor
James Spencer, University of Hawaii-Manoa


3:00-3:30 pm Refreshment Break

3:30-4:30 pm
Session VI: Comparing Public and Privately-Run Water and Sanitation Systems
Martin Bosman, University of South Florida
Daniel Klooster, Florida State University


4:30-5:30
Session VII: The Conundrum of Finance and Time in the Production of Local Infrastructure
Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal



WEDNESDAY, MAY 18, 2005
The Fireside Room


9:00-10:00 am
Session VIII: The Shifting of Public Authority in the Provision of Public Goods at the Local Level
Kinuthia Macharia, American University


10:00-10:30 am Refreshment Break

10:30-11:30 am
Session IX: The Polarizing Effect of Globalization Between Capital Cities and Secondary Towns
Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal


12:00-1:00 pm Lunch

1:00-2:00 pm
Session X: The Basic Social and Physical Urban Infrastructure Requirements for Urban Growth and Development with Acceptable Levels of Health Outcomes
Deane Neubauer, University of Hawaii-Manoa


2:00-3:00 pm
Session XI: Civil Society and Domestic Private Sector Participation in the Provision of Water Supply and Sanitation
Davinder Lamba, Mazingira Institute
Ali Memon, Lincoln University


3:00-3:30 pm Refreshment Break

3:30-4:30 pm
Session XII: Urban Governance and Infrastructure Development
D Tipping, former UN Staff Member


4:30-5:30
Session XIII: The Peripheralization of the Urban Poor in the Local Manifestations of the Global Economy
Charisma Acey, University of California-Los Angeles
Edmond Keller, University of California-Los Angeles
Stephen Commins, University of California-Los Angeles



THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005
The Fireside Room


8:30-10:45 am
Closing Remarks: Theoretical and Policy Implications Resulting from our Dialogue? Outlining the Concluding Chapter of the Volume
Fantu Cheru, American University
Edmond Keller, University of California-Los Angeles
Deane Neubauer, University of Hawaii-Manoa