Women, Peace and Security through a Vernacular Frame: Global/local Frictions in Solomon Islands and Bougainville


Women, Peace and Security through a Vernacular Frame: Global/local Frictions in Solomon Islands and Bougainville

"Security Council", Scott Turner via Flickr


Monday, April 09, 2018
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Rolfe Hall 2125


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Since the early 2000s, United Nations Security Council Resolutions on Women Peace and Security, and particularly UNSCR 1325, have become a key focus of policy-making and gender advocacy for promoting women’s roles in conflict resolution and transition in the western Pacific Islands region. But in these contexts, arguments about the rights of women to be recognized as those who bear specific sorts of burdens in times of instability come into friction with vernacular notions of security and localized sentiments about the safe ordering of community. In this talk, I reflect on the recent academic development of the concept of vernacular security and the insights this work might offer into the challenges surrounding the promotion of women, peace, and security principles in the Solomon Islands and Bougainville.

 

Dr. Nicole George is a Senior Lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies in the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. She has a strong interest in the way gender and politics are configured in Pacific Island contexts, with a particular recent focus on the gendered impacts of conflict in the region and the
roles played by women in peace building and conflict transition. Recent publications on these themes appear in International Feminist Journal of Politics, Policing and Society, Third World Thematics, International Political Science Review, and the Australian Journal of International Affairs.


Sponsor(s): Asia Pacific Center, Asian American Studies Center, American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, UCLA Center for the Study of Women