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Hong Kong and Political Change in China: The Meaning of the Sept. 12 Legislative Election

Christine Loh, former legislator, political party founder, and think tank CEO speaks; UCLA political scientist Richard Baum leads the follow-up discussion.

A record portion of the Hong Kong electorate turned out for the elections which followed a summer of demonstrations, one of which attracted half a million marchers. 60% of those voting supported pro-democracy candidates. Join us to hear Christine Loh and Richard Baum discuss the importance of the election.

4:30 - 6:30 pm
UCLA Faculty Center, Hacienda Room
Free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested -- call 310 825-0007 or write asia@international.ucla.edu

Trained as an attorney, Christine Loh had a distinguished business career, including stints as managing director of commodities trading and strategic planning for divisions of Salomon, Inc. (now Salomon Smith Barney). Among her many business achievements was the opening of operations in China and assembling a consortium to build a container terminal in Hong Kong. Since 1992, however, she's channeled her energies into public service, first as a member of Hong Kong's Legislative Council (1992-2000) and as a founder of Civic Exchange, a public policy think.  As a member of the Legislative Council, Ms. Loh successfully pushed for greater transparency in government and for strengthening environmental protections. She led the Citizens Party from 1996 through 2000. Ms. Loh has been Civic Exchange's CEO since its creation in 2000. The organization carries out research on a wide range of issues, including promoting public participation in government, economic development, and improving Hong Kong's environment.

Christine Loh recently published an essay on the election. Click here to read it.

Richard Baum has taught political science at UCLA for 35 years and has written or edited eight books and numerous articles. Among his most influential works is Burying Mao: Chinese Politics in the Age of Deng Xiaoping (Princeton, 1996). Professor Baum has served as the director of the Center for Chinese Studies since 1999. News organizations such as the BBC, CNN, the Asian Wall Street Journal, and the Los Angeles Times regularly draw upon his knowledge of China's domestic politics and international relations.

 

Asia Institute