Public Health Summit: Weapons of Mass Destruction


Organized by UCLA Extension and Physicians for Social Responsibility, and cosponsored by UCLA School of Public Health, UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations, Southern California Association of Governments, and Global Green

Sunday, June 02, 2002
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Ackerman Grand Ballroom
Ackerman Student Union Building
UCLA
Los Angeles, CA 90095

For more information visit: www.psrla.org

8:00 - 9:00 AM
Registration and light breakfast

9:00 - 9:20 AM
Welcome and overview of conference objectives.
Linda Rosenstock, M.D., M.P.H, Dean, UCLA School of Public Health and Michael D. Intriligator, Director, Burkle Center for International Relations

9:20 - 10:05 AM
Terrorist Threat; A Chemical Weapon Attack
Scenario of a sarin gas attack on LA— Matt Peterson, President and CEO, Global Green USA

1. General description of attack
2. Likely emergency management response
3. Public health response; how doctors could help as well as be unable to assist
4. Evaluating state/county/federal emergency management plans
5. Inadequacies related to current plans
6. View of attack’s impact on transportation

Chemical Weapons, the broad view — Paul F. Walker, Ph.D., former Professional Staff Member with the Armed Services Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives, currently Legacy Program Director of Global Green USA

1. Likely suspects
2. Likely means of obtaining/importing chemical weapons
3. Prevention - treaties & agreements
4. Prevention - policies currently in place & Bush Administration proposals
5. What laws/treaties/regulatory policies need to be maintained
6. Prevention - new policies: what’s possible, what’s ideal
7. What the public can do

Q and A (three questions from floor)

10:05 - 11:15 AM
Terrorist Threat; A Nuclear Weapon Attack

Scenario of 12.5 kiloton attack at LA City Hall — Herbert L. Abrams, M.D., Professor Emeritus and Member in Residence, Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation

1. Physical Effects: blast, heat,, eye damage, firestorm
2. Radiological Effects: initial radiation, fallout
3. Likely emergency management response
4. Public health response; how doctors could help as well as be unable to assist
5. Evaluating state/county/federal emergency management plans
6. Inadequacies related to current plans

Nuclear Weapons, the broad view — Merav Datan, JD, Director, UN Office, Physicians for Social Responsibility & International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War

1. What nation/organization would use such a weapon?
2. What treaties & agreements are in place to avert such an attack?
3. Within the Bush Administration, what policies are currently in place to address such an attack?
4. What new proposals are coming out of the administration?
5. What can the public proactively do to protect themselves?
6. What laws/treaties/regulatory policies need to be maintained?
7. What new policies are on the table: what’s possible, what’s ideal?

Q and A (three questions from floor)

11:15 - 11:25 AM Break

11:25 - 12:00 Noon
Terrorist Threat; A Radiological Weapon Attack

Radioactive Materials equivalent to dry cask contents exploded at LA City Hall — Steven E. Koonin, PhD, Provost, California Institute of Technology

1. Explosion, initial radiation, long-term fallout
2. Psychological responses
3. Likely emergency management response
4. Public health response; how doctors could help as well as be unable to assist
5. Evaluating state/county/federal emergency management plans
6. Inadequacies

How would emergency management respond? — James R. Greenwood, PhD, MPH, Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Health and Director, Environment, Health and Safety, UCLA

12:00 - 1:15 Lunch

12:05 - 1:00 Luncheon Speaker
Luncheon Keynote: The Real Impacts of Terrorism; introduced by Los Angeles City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, President Pro Tempore

Richard Butler, Diplomat-in-Residence, Council on Foreign Relations; formerly Australian Ambassador to the United Nations and Executive Chairman of United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) (1997-99)

Where Do We Go From Here? Policy Remedies; A View from Non-Governmental Organizations — Mary-Wynne Ashford, MD, IPPNW Co-President

1:15 - 2:00
Terrorist Threat; A Biological Weapon Attack

Scenario: bio-agents distributed at LAX terminal — Peter Katona M.D., FACP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine, Infectious Disease Division, Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine

1. Method of distribution
2. Emergency management response
3. Public health response; how doctors could help as well as be unable to assist
4. Evaluating state/county/federal emergency management plans
5. Inadequacies

Overview of Biological Weapons — Robert Gould M.D., President, Physicians for Social Responsibility-San Francisco

Q and A (three questions)

2:00 - 2:10 PM Break

2:10 - 2:35 PM

Control of Fissile and Radioactive Material — Ed Lyman, PhD, Scientific Director, Nuclear Control Institute

1. What nation/organization would obtain this material?
2. What treaties & agreements are in place to control radioactive and fissile material?
3. Within the Bush Administration, what policies are currently in place to address the use of this material?
4. What new proposals are coming out of the administration?
5. What can the public proactively do to protect themselves?
6. What laws/treaties/regulatory policies need to be maintained?
7. What new policies are on the table: what’s possible, what’s ideal?

Q and A (three questions from floor)

2:35 - 3:05 PM
Terrorist Threat; An Attack on a Commercial Nuclear Reactor

Scenario: Insurgents raid San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station —Daniel Hirsch, President, Committee to Bridge the Gap

1. Physical Effects
2. Likely emergency management response
3. Public health response; how doctors could help as well as be unable to assist
4. Long-term effects
5. Evaluating state/county/federal emergency management plans
6. Inadequacies
7. Policy on Prevention
8. Remedies
9. Likely suspects
10. Ability to thwart security
11. Prevention - policies currently in place & Bush Administration proposals
12. Prevention - new policies: what’s possible, what’s ideal?

Q and A (three questions from floor)

3:05 - 3:15 Break

3:15-4:30 PM
Are government agencies prepared? A Four-tier discussion: Government and Elected Officials, Expert/Activists, Public Q&A

Jonathan Parfrey, Executive Director, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Los Angeles — moderator
Elis Stanley, City of Los Angeles Department of Emergency Preparedness
Representative from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control
Karen Armes, Director, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Region IX
Keith Harrison, Deputy Regional Administrator, Office of Emergency Services, State of California

Elected officials:

Mark A. Pisano, Executive Director, Southern California Association of Governments
Congresswoman Diane Watson
Councilman Jack Weiss
State Assemblymember Hannah-Beth Jackson
Zev Yaroslavsky, LA County Board of Supervisors

4:30 - 5:00 PM

A Prescription for Prevention; What You Can Do — Dr. Helen Caldicott, President, The Nuclear Policy Research Institute

To RSVP or for more information, call (213)386-4901 or (310)825-7093


Cost : $25

Sponsor(s): Burkle Center for International Relations