Introduction

A one-day conference sponsored by the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies, the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations, and the UCLA Asia Institute

 

Friday, January 30, 2009

 

"Two Systems, One World" brings together leading figures from the worlds of academia,  policy analysis, and policy making to analyze the most pressing challenges facing the Obama administration as it formulates its China policy -- from politics and security to energy, the environment, and the economy

Attendance to the Keynote Lunch with Gen. Wesley K. Clark is by registration only, however, all seats to the lunch have been sold out and registration is now closed.

Please note that attendance at the two panels is free and open to the public. No registration is required to attend the panels.

 

Since Richard Nixon began the process of "normalization" of relations with China in 1972, the primary goal of U.S. China policy has remained remarkably consistent: to engage China constructively, with a view toward assisting it to become a responsible stakeholder in the global community. However, the recent onset of a major global recession has called into question the long-term efficacy of that policy. In what direction might U.S. policy toward China move under the Obama administration? In what direction should it move?

Among the pressing economic issues facing the new administration in its dealings with Beijing are lingering allegations of Chinese currency manipulation, improper export subsidies, theft of intellectual property, and ballooning bilateral trade imbalances. If the current recession continues to worsen, Congress is likely to press the Obama administration to protect American exports and limit Chinese imports, leading to increased trade friction with Beijing. Compounding these issues is growing uncertainty over China's intentions with respect to its massive holdings of dollar-denominated US Treasury securities.

Environmental issues are likely to be a further point of contention in U.S.-China relations in the next four years.  With economic growth rates slowing dramatically in both countries, domestic pressures in each will tend to promote growth over environmental protection. How to manage post-Kyoto environmental issues thus looms as a major issue for the Obama administration.

While tensions across the Taiwan Strait have diminished in recent months, there remain serious disagreements between Beijing and Washington over Taiwan's status and over continuing U.S. arms sales to Taipei.

And the recent eruption of--and crackdown on--widespread protest demonstrations in Tibet underlines continuing Sino-American disagreement over basic issues of human rights.

These and other outstanding issues facing the Obama administration will be the subject of “Two Systems, One World.” The conference brings together leading figures from the worlds of academia,  policy analysis, and policy making to analyze the most pressing challenges facing the Obama administration as it formulates its China policy -- from politics and security to energy, the environment, Taiwan, and the economy.

For more information, contact:

Richard Gunde. Assistant Director, Center for Chinese Studies
11381 Bunche Hall
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1487
Tel: (310) 825-8683
Fax: (310) 206-3555
gunde@ucla.edu