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The Politics of Anti-Human Trafficking: Indonesia, Thailand, and the United States in Comparative Perspective

The Politics of Anti-Human Trafficking: Indonesia, Thailand, and the United States in Comparative Perspective

Colloquium with Faisal Idris, Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Wednesday, February 19, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
10383 Bunche Hall
UCLA Campus
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Human trafficking, universally described as modern-day slavery, has become a major concern over the past two decades. This presentation examines the significance of political institutions that constrain and support efforts to fight against human trafficking. It analyzes the robust intersections between state interventions to combat human trafficking and anti-trafficking movements in Indonesia, Thailand, and the United States, exploring different configurations of contention between state and society in anti-trafficking policies across these three countries. Different patterns of political organizations and state structures have led to varied opportunities that inhibit or encourage anti-trafficking efforts, thus resulting in different outcomes.

Faisal Nurdin Idris is a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In Indonesia, he is a tenured lecturer of Political Science and International Relations at the State Islamic University Jakarta. In 2008, Mr. Idris received his master’s degree in Political Science from the Faculty of Legal, Political and Social Sciences at the University of Lille 2 in France, and undertook a research internship at the European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS) in Brussels, Belgium. In 2010, he served as a visiting fellow at the Indonesian Young Leaders Programme at Leiden University in the Netherlands.  Mr. Idris’ current research interest focuses on the intersections between security and political systems in a comparative perspective. His latest studies focus on the politics of anti-human trafficking in Indonesia, Thailand and the United States, and on narrative to understand patterns of transmission and acceptance toward radicalism and terrorism in Indonesia.


Cost : Free and open to the public.

BarbaraGaerlan
310-206-9163
www.international.ucla.edu/cseas/
cseas@international.ucla.edu

Sponsor(s): Center for Southeast Asian Studies