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Southeast Asians and the Pilgrimage to Mecca: Long-Term Economic Patterns, Earliest Times to the Present

Southeast Asians and the Pilgrimage to Mecca: Long-Term Economic Patterns, Earliest Times to the Present

Colloquium with Prof. Eric Tagliacozzo, Cornell University

Thursday, February 26, 2004
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
10383 Bunche Hall
UCLA Campus
Los Angeles, CA 90095

How did Southeast Asian pilgrims to Mecca pay for their Hajj?  The pilgrimage to the Holy sites in Mecca and Medina could cost many times what an average Southeast Asian would earn in a year of farming, fishing, or trading, so planning and executing a voyage to the Arabian peninsula was very serious business for most Muslims.  This presentation will look at some of the methods used by pilgrims to organize and pay for their pilgrimages.  This will be an initial stab at isolating certain mechanisms that were in use to finance devotion.  This was devotion on a grand scale, however, the kind that needed adequate and long-distance planning.  Historically as today, these procedures were complicated and sometimes open to certain abuses, with regional governments getting involved.  Because of this intercession, there are often quite interesting records to analyze in telling this story.

Eric Tagliacozzo is Assistant Professor of History and Southeast Asian Studies at Cornell University.  His work has focused on the history of smuggling in Southeast Asia, as presented in his forthcoming book from Yale University Press (2005), Secret Trades of the Straits: Smuggling and State-Formation Along a Southeast Asian Frontier (1865-1915).  He has also published numerous articles on smuggling, borders, oceanic history, and the history of long duree trade networks in a variety of edited books and journals.  His new book project focuses on a history of the Hajj from Southeast Asia to Mecca, earliest times to the present.


Cost : Free and open to the public.

BarbaraGaerlan
310-206-9163
www.international.ucla.edu/cseas/
cseas@international.ucla.edu

Sponsor(s): Center for Southeast Asian Studies