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Bilateralism Reconsidered: the Endowment of Local Succession in Early Modern Viet Nam

Bilateralism Reconsidered: the Endowment of Local Succession in Early Modern Viet Nam

A colloquium with Prof. Nhung Tuyet Tran, Department of History, University of Toronto

Thursday, March 10, 2005
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
10383 Bunche Hall
UCLA Campus
Los Angeles, CA 90095

The literature on Southeast Asia generally highlights the practice of cognatic kinship as a defining feature of regional identity.  Although Viet Nam has long been considered as a peripheral state in this region, the presumed practice of bilateral succession categorically ties it to the Southeast Asian region.  This paper challenges assertions that the principles of bi-lateral succession characterized Vietnamese code and custom through analysis of legal codes, case records, and stele inscriptions from early modern Dai Viet.  It explores how state code, village custom (through local regulations), and judicial magistrates excluded women from the material and spiritual benefits of succession. Some local women, however, negotiated these structures to gain prominent roles in local economic and religious life. Through a gendered analysis of legal code and local practice, this paper seeks to introduce an alternative model of succession in early modern Vietnamese society.

Nhung Tuyet Tran is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of Toronto.  She received her Ph.D. at UCLA and is currently writing a social history of women in Viet Nam, tentatively titled, "Vietnamese Women at the Crossroads of Southeast Asia: Gender and Society in the Early Modern Period."  She is also working on a project that examines the social, economic and spiritual foundations of the early Vietnamese Catholic Church through the experiences of early converts.

Parking in UCLA Lot 3 costs $7.


Cost : Free and open to the public.

BarbaraGaerlan
310-206-9163
www.international.ucla.edu/cseas/
cseas@international.ucla.edu

Sponsor(s): Center for Southeast Asian Studies