Panel Discussion around The Making of the Tunisian Revolution: Contexts, Architects, Prospects

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
4:30 PM
10383 Bunche Hall
UCLA

The Arab uprisings which shook the world in late 2010 and along 2011 have largely gone awry three years after. Tunisia, however, remains on track despite the many challenges ahead. This panel will shed light on the state of the Tunisian revolution so far and present a recent edited volume titled The Making of the Tunisian Revolution: Contexts, Architects, Prospects. The book will be available for purchase at the event.


Francesco Cavatorta (Universite' Laval, Quebec, Canada)

Francesco Cavatorta is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the Universite' Laval in Quebec, Canada. He has previously served as Senior Lecturer in International Relations and Middle East Politics at the School of Law and Government at Dublin City University in Ireland. His research focuses on democratization and authoritarianism in the Arab world, the role of Islamist parties and movements, and the dynamics of civil society. His most recent publications in 2013 include articles in Middle East Law and Governance, Mediterranean Politics, Democratization, Middle Eastern Studies, Orient and Digest of Middle East Studies. His most recent book is a co-edited volume, Civil society activism in Syria and Iran (lynne Rienner 2013). He is currently working on a project on Salafism in the Arab world after the uprisings.

 

Amy Kallander (Syracuse University)

Amy Kallander is an Assistant Professor of Middle East History at Syracuse University. She is a scholar of Ottoman and modern Tunisia, focusing mainly on women, gender, and family. Her first book is a social history of women and that family that governed Tunisia in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, situating the province in relation to the Ottoman center as well as French colonial rule. Recent writing on social media, politics, and the Tunisian revolution has appeared in Middle East Report Online and the e-journal Arab Media & Society.


Nouri Gana (UCLA)

Nouri Gana is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature & Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Signifying Loss: Toward a Poetics of Narrative Mourning (Bucknell UP, 2011), and the editor of The Making of the Tunisian Revolution: Contexts, Architects, Prospects and of The Edinburgh Companion to the Arab Novel in English (Edinburgh UP, 2013). He is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of melancholia in the Arab world and another on the history of cultural dissent in colonial and postcolonial Tunisia


JohannaRomero
(310) 825-1181

web.international.ucla.edu/cnes


romero@international.ucla.edu

Sponsor(s): Center for Near Eastern Studies, Department of History, Political Theory Workshop

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