Institute launches new international migration studies minor

Migrants pass through the border from Greece into Macedonia, 2015. Photo courtesy of Freedom House via Flickr.


Institute launches new international migration studies minor

The new undergraduate minor will officially begin in fall 2017, but juniors must apply this spring.

"We are thrilled to be able to offer undergraduates a rigorous minor in this field, designed to equip them with the analytical skills they need to understand the multiple dimensions of migration patterns and policy." Professor Roger Waldinger

UCLA International Institute, March 20, 2017 — The UCLA International Institute is launching a new undergraduate minor in international migration studies and will be selecting its first cohort for 2017–18. The program aims to give students an appreciation of international migration, drawing on a broad array of disciplines and methodological approaches to study this vast social and intellectual phenomenon.

Prospective students must apply to the program no later than spring quarter of their junior year. That is, current UCLA juniors who wish to pursue the minor in their senior year should apply to the program in spring quarter 2017.

Requirements include the completion of seven upper-division courses, culminating in a written thesis of approximately 30 pages. In addition to a core course in comparative migration or comparative assimilation plus three required theory/research courses, students will take four electives offered by humanities and social science departments of the College of Letters and Science.

Students will also be exposed to the latest scholarship on international migration studies through the colloquia and speaker series of the Center for the Study of International Migration, which feature scholars from across the United States and the world. Distinguished Professor of Sociology Roger Waldinger, director of the center, is also the academic chair of the minor program.

“The responses to migration and the worldwide refugee crisis that we are witnessing in the United States and Europe directly affect people’s everyday lives and plans, including those of our students,” said Waldinger. “We are thrilled to be able to offer undergraduates a rigorous minor in this field, designed to equip them with the analytical skills they need to understand the multiple dimensions of migration patterns and policy.

“Understanding migrants’ emergent identities and the problems of belonging and acceptance that migration generates requires attention both to the micro level,” he continued, “as well as to the specific historical and cultural contexts surrounding both migration flows and societal responses.”

The minor will complement the work of the Center for the Study of International Migration, which is a hub for scholarly research and exchange among UCLA faculty and graduate students working on the topic.

*Originally published March 20, 2017; updated on April 12, 2017.

 

 

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017

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