Dual Citizenship in a Globalized World: The Case of Israel and the EU

Dual Citizenship in a Globalized World: The Case of Israel and the EU

Tel-Aviv University Professor Yossi Harpaz will analyze the proliferation of EU dual citizenship in Israel in the context of social and ideological changes in Israeli society.

Monday, February 26, 2018

5:00 PM - 6:15 PM
UCLA School of Law, Room 1420





Co-sponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, the Center for Near Eastern Studies, the Center for European and Russian Studies and the Center for the Study of International Migration.

About the Talk

Over the past two decades, a new and provocative trend emerged in Israel: tens of thousands of Israelis are applying to acquire citizenship from the European countries whose parents and grandparents had left as refugees. Most citizenship applicants do not plan to "return" to Germany or Poland, but rather are interested in securing a second, European Union passport that they view as an insurance policy, enhancer of opportunities and even status symbol.

Drawing on administrative statistics and interview material, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Tel-Aviv University Yossi Harpaz will analyze the proliferation of EU dual citizenship in Israel in the context of social and ideological changes in Israeli society, while connecting it to a broader worldwide shift in the meaning of citizenship.

About the Speaker

Yossi Harpaz is an Assistant Professor in Sociology at Tel-Aviv University. His research deals with globalization, immigration, ethnicity and nationalism. He focuses on studying the effects of global changes in citizenship rules - especially the growing acceptance of multiple and non-resident citizenship - and their impact on the meaning of nationality. Harpaz uses a range of data and methods – original statistics, interviews and comparative-historical analysis – to explore the growth of a new relation to national membership which diverges from the traditional view of citizenship as a binding, exclusive tie to a specific nation-state. Harpaz earned his Ph.D. in Sociology from Princeton University in 2016. His work has been published in International Migration Review, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies and other publications.


Sponsor(s): Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies, Center for Near Eastern Studies, Center for European and Russian Studies, Center for the Study of International Migration, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

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