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Professor to Share Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Geography Professor Judith Carney and a co-author demonstrate, in "In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa's Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World," not only the legacy of farming that the slaves brought with them from Africa, but also the importance of the botanical gardens that they kept in America, as well as the impact that they had on the developing American food culture.

By Kelsey Sharpe

Each year Yale University’s Gilder Lehman Center for the Study of Slavery awards a $25,000 prize to the best book written in English on slavery or abolition. This year three individuals will share the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, including Judith Carney, UCLA professor of geography, and her co-author Richard Rosomoff.
 
Their book "In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World" explores the story of how enslaved Africans left their influence on the country through their cultivation of the land. The authors demonstrate not only the legacy of farming that the slaves brought with them from Africa, but also the importance of the botanical gardens that they kept in America, as well as the impact that they had on the developing American food culture.
 
The prize will be awarded to Carney, Rosomoff and Siddharth Kara, the third winner, at a banquet to be held in New York City in 2011.

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