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UCLA professor to speak on Korean art at Getty Center

Burglind Jungmann, UCLA Professor of Art History and a member of the core faculty of the Center for Korean Studies, will speak at a Getty Center symposium today, Friday, March 15.

Peggy McInerny Email PeggyMcInerny

International Institute, UCLA, March 15, 2013—Burglind Jungmann, UCLA Professor of Art History and a member of the core faculty of the Center for Korean Studies, will speak at a Getty Center symposium today, Friday, March 15 (see below).

"Crossing Borders, Drawing Boundaries: Contextualizing Rubens’s ‘Man in Korean Costume’” is one of several events associated with the J. Paul Getty Museum’s new exhibit, “Looking East: Ruben’s Encounter with Asia,” which runs through June 9.

The exhibit is built around a drawing of a man in Asian dress created by Peter Paul Rubens around 1617. According to the Getty Museum, Rubens, who never traveled to Korea, may have encountered Korean court dress through his interactions with European missionaries returning from China.

The symposium will examine how Europeans and Asians perceived one another in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Jungmann, a specialist in Korean art history who was also one of several consultants to the curator of the Getty show, will discuss how the advent of Western visitors affected Korean art.

Jungmann first went to Korea as an exchange student in 1973 and has returned more or less annually ever since. A member of the UCLA art history faculty since 1999, she has been instrumental in developing an academic art history specialization in Korean art, both at UCLA and worldwide. The demanding field requires fluency in Korean, Chinese, and Japanese, languages she acquired during her graduate art history studies at Heidelberg University and Seoul National University, as well as long research stints in Korea and Japan.

Since 2004, Jungmann has been an adjunct professor at Korea University in Seoul. The talented scholar has also helped curate Korean art exhibits. She served as Curator of Korean Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from 1999 to 2003 and guest curated the exhibition “Life in Ceramics—Five Contemporary Korean Artists” at the UCLA Fowler Museum in 2010–2011, for which she also wrote the catalogue.

Soon to depart for four months in Korea, Jungmann is currently working on a new book, “Korean Paintings of the Joseon Period (1392–1910)—Pathways to Culture, Society and Politics.”

There is a $10 admission to the symposium. For information, contact the Getty Center. Click here for more information on the “Looking East” exhibit at the Getty.

Prof. Jungmann’s first book, on 16th century Korean painting and its reception of the Chinese Zhe school, was published in Germany in 1992 (Steiner Verlag). Her monograph “Painters as Envoys—Korean Inspiration in Eighteenth Century Japanese Nanga” (Princeton University Press 2004) explores Korean embassies to Japan and their impact on Japanese literati painting. Jungmann recently co-edited “Shifting Paradigms in East Asian Visual Culture: A Festschrift for Lothar Ledderose” (Stuttgart 2012).

 

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