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Contributors

Russell N. Campbell was the former Chair of the Department of Applied Linguistics, the director emeritus of the Language Resource Center, and an editorial board member of the Heritage Language Journal. Dr. Campbell died in March, 2003.

Kiyomi Chinen is a doctoral student in the Department of Modern Languages at Carnegie Mellon University. Her current research interest is heritage language development by Japanese-American students in Los Angeles. She is also a member of a research team collecting longitudinal data on the literacy development of English-speaking students studying Japanese as a foreign language in Pittsburgh elementary school.
web page: http://ml.hss.cmu.edu/ml/curriculum/gradstudies/SLA/gradstudents/Chinen.html

Donna Christian has been the president of the Center for Applied Linguistics since 1994. Her work focuses on language in education, including issues of second language learning and dialect diversity. She has been involved in research on two-way bilingual immersion programs for over 15 years. She is also a senior advisor to the Heritage Languages Initiative and the Biliteracy Research Program.
web page: http://www.cal.org

Kathleen Dillon is the Associate Director of the UC Consortium for Language Learning and Teaching as well as the Executive Director of AATSEEL. In addition to writing articles on pedagogy, she has contributed articles on Boris Pasternak as well as pedagogy to the Slavic and East European Journal and chapters on Adelaida Gertsyk and Elisaveta Shakhova to Russian Women Writers (Garland, 1999) and The Dictionary of Literary Biography (Brucoli Clark Layman, 2003). Her current research interests are the writings of Russian nuns and heritage language acquisition.
web page: http://uccllt.ucdavis.edu/

Lily Wong Fillmore is the Jerome A. Hutto Professor of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Her professional specializations are second language learning and teaching, the education of language minority students, and the socialization of children for learning across cultures. She has a particular interest in the revitalization of indigenous languages in the Southwest. Her recent publications include "What Teachers Need to Know About Language" (with C. Snow); "Language in Education"; and "The Loss of Family Languages: Should Educators Be Concerned?"
web page: http://www-gse.berkeley.edu/program/courses/lwf/lily.html

Norma E. González is an Associate Professor in the Department of Education, Culture and Society at the University of Utah. She is an anthropologist with specializations in anthropology and education, linguistic anthropology and applied anthropology. Her interest in Heritage Languages stems from her work in language socialization in the borderlands, and she is the author of I am My Language: Discourses of Women and Children in the Borderlands (2001). In addition, her research has focused on connecting schools and communities, and she is an editor of the forthcoming book Funds of Knowledge: Theorizing Practices in Households and Schools.
web page: http://www.ed.utah.edu/ECS/facultypages/Norma.html

Nancy H. Hornberger is Professor of Education and Director of Educational Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, where she also convenes the annual Ethnography in Education Research Forum. She specializes and has published widely in sociolinguistics, language planning, bilingualism and biliteracy, and educational policy and practice for indigenous and immigrant language minorities in the United States and internationally.
web page: http://www.gse.upenn.edu/faculty/hornberger.html

Olga Kagan is Coordinator of the Russian Language Program and Director of the Language Resource Center at UCLA. Her current research interest is heritage language acquisition and maintenance. She has co-authored a textbook for heritage speakers of Russian (O. Kagan, T. Akishina, R. Robin, Russian for Russians, Bloomington, IN: Slavica Publishers, 2002).
web page: http://www.humnet.ucla.edu/humnet/slavic/faculty/kagan_o.html

Kimi Kondo-Brown is an assistant professor in the department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
web page: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~kondo/

Joseph Lo Bianco is the founder of the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia and visiting professor in the faculty of education at the University of Melbourne and languages and comparative cultural studies at the University of Queensland. In 1987 he authored the National Policy on Languages, Australia's first comprehensive language plan, adopted and implemented by the Federal government. His main research interests are in language policy and planning, multi-modal literacy, heritage languages and the impact of globalisation of language and cultural diversity. Recent books include Australian Literacies (2001); Australian Policy Activism in Language and Literacy (2001); Voices from Phnom Penh, Development and Language (2002) and Teaching Invisible Culture: Classroom Practice and Theory (2003). During 2002 he was the Charles A. Ferguson Fellow at the Center for Applied Linguistics.
web page: http://languageaustralia.com.au/whoweare/bianco1.htm

Andrew Lynch is Assistant Professor of Spanish and Linguistics at the University of Florida, where he teaches graduate courses on sociolinguistics, language contact, and language in society. His areas of research interest are the sociolinguistics of Spanish in the United States and Spanish-English bilingualism. His work has appeared in Hispania, Spanish Applied Linguistics, Research on Spanish in the United States (Cascadilla Press, 2000) and Mi Lengua: Spanish as a Heritage Language in the United States (Georgetown UP, 2003). His current investigations deal with Spanish in Miami.
web page: www.clas.ufl.edu/users/alynch

Reynaldo F. Macías is Professor of Chicana/o Studies, Education and Applied Linguistics at UCLA. His research interests are in language politics and language demography, bi-literacy and education.
web page: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/chavez/chair.html

Sachiko Matsunaga is an associate professor at California State University, Los Angeles. Her research fields include psycholinguistics in reading Japanese as a first, second, and heritage language and the Japanese writing system. She recently co-organized a symposium on teaching Japanese as a heritage language in Southern California.
web page: http://www.calstatela.edu/faculty/smatsun/smatsun.htm

Glenn Martinez is Assistant Professor and Director of the Spanish for Heritage Learners program in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Arizona. His research areas include Spanish in the Southwest, applied sociolinguistics, and heritage language pedagogy.
web page: http://www.coh.arizona.edu/spanish/facultystaff.html

Asya Pereltsvaig is a Lecturer in linguistics at California State University Long Beach. Her research interests include phrase structure, thematic relations, case, and language attrition (especially American Russian).
web page: http://www.hum.uit.no/a/pereltsvaig/home_page.htm

Maria Polinsky is a professor of linguistics at the Department of Linguistics, UCSD. Her main interests are in the areas of language universals, syntax-to-information structure interface, and language contact/heritage languages. She combines her work in linguistic theory with a keen interest in psycholinguistic explanations for language universals and language change. Her work on heritage languages focuses on recurrent grammatical patterns across different languages and on competence-based differences between heritage and non-heritage speakers.
web page: http://ling.ucsd.edu/~polinsky/index.html#3

Sarah J. Shin is an Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, where she teaches in the M.A. Program in ESOL/Bilingual Education and in the Ph.D. Program in Language, Literacy, and Culture. Her research interests include bilingualism, heritage language education, and second language writing.
web page: http://www.umbc.edu/education/faculty/shin/sarahshin.htm

Christine P. Sims is on the faculty at the University of New Mexico in two departments, the Department of Linguistics and the Department of Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies in the College of Education. Sims is also chair of the Linguistic Institute for Native Americans, a New Mexico based Native teacher training association, and works with various American Indian tribes on issues of Native Heritage Language maintenance and revitalization.
web page: http://www.unm.edu/~linguist/faculty.html

G. Richard Tucker is Professor of Applied Linguistics and Head of the Department of Modern Languages at Carnegie Mellon University. He has published more than 200 books, articles, or reviews concerning diverse aspects of second language learning and teaching. In addition to his work in North America, he has spent a number of years living and working as a Language Education advisor for the International Division of the Ford Foundation in Southeast Asia and in the Middle East and North Africa.
web page: http://ml.hss.cmu.edu/ml/about/faculty/tucker.html

Guadalupe Valdés is a Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and in the School of Education at Stanford University. Much of Valdes' work has focused on the English-Spanish bilingualism of Latinos in the United States and on discovering and describing how two languages are developed, used, and maintained by individuals who become bilingual in immigrant communities.
web page: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/span-port/faculty/valdes.html

Terrence Wiley is the Division Director of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Arizona State University. His research interests include educational language policies, politics, and history; literacy and biliteracy theory and policies; and the history of education and educational reform for diverse groups. He is an editor of the Journal of Language, Identity and Education.
web page: http://coe.asu.edu/wiley

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