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The Rise of Asia in the 21st Century: Can America Handle the Challenge?

The Rise of Asia in the 21st Century: Can America Handle the Challenge?

Today, February 19, 2008, at 5:00 pm, the Burkle Center and UCLA Media Center are hosting a lecture at the UCLA Faculty Center (Sequoia Room) with the Hon. Kishore Mahbubani, Singapore's Former UN Ambassador & Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. Kishore Mahbubani has written many articles on world affairs; his most recent Op-Ed "Ringing in the Asian Century" is featured in today's Los Angeles Times.

Tuesday, February 19, 2008
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
UCLA Faculty Center
Free and open to the public.
Limited seating available, RSVP to ucla.mc@gmail.com to secure a seat.

 Kishore Mahbubani is the author of the forthcoming book The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Power to the East, available early 2008, as well as Can Asians Think? and Beyond the Age of Innocence: Rebuilding Trust between America and the World. Most recently, Kishore Mahbubani's Op Ed "Ringing in the Asian Century" was featured in the Los Angeles Times (Opinion Section, February 19, 2008).

Below is brief exert from Kishore Mahbubani's Op Ed "Ringing in the Asian Century" as featured in the Los Angeles Times (Opinion Section, February 19, 2008):

        "We are entering a new era of world history: the end of Western domination and the arrival of the Asian century. The question is: Will Washington wake up to this reality? When the new president meets with schedulers in January, will he or she say, "Cut down on the visits to Europe. Send me across the Pacific, not the Atlantic. The G-8 represents a sunset process. Let us focus on the new sunrise organizations in Asia."

        If such a shift seems inconceivable, it shows how much old mental maps continue to cloud the vision of leading Americans. The West has so dominated world history for the last 200 years that we forget that from the year 1 to the year 1820, the two largest economies in the world (as demonstrated by British economic historian Angus Maddison) were China and India. A study by Goldman Sachs in 2003 confidently predicted that by 2050, the four largest economies in the world will be China, the U.S., India and Japan, in that order. A more recent evaluation by Goldman Sachs showed that this could happen sooner and that the Indian economy could surpass that of the U.S. by 2043."

Click here to view the full and original article.

 


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Sponsor(s): Center for Southeast Asian Studies, UCLA Media Center

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